Posts by category: Funding and losses

Share of global Climate Debt rank 31st, 32nd and 33rd: Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (combined responsible for 1.0% of Climate Debt and 1.6% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 31st, 32nd and 33rd: Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (combined responsible for 1.0% of Climate Debt and 1.6% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (ranked 31st, 32nd and 33rd). The share of Argentina is increasing while the share of Thailand has flattened out.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 28th, 29th and 30th: Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (combined responsible for 1.2% of Climate Debt and 2.2% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 28th, 29th and 30th: Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (combined responsible for 1.2% of Climate Debt and 2.2% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (ranked 28th, 29th and 30th). In 2015, the shares of each of the three countries were 0.40 or 0.41% of global Climate Debt.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 25th, 26th and 27th: Poland, Belgium and Brazil (combined responsible for 1.3% of Climate Debt and 2.4% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 25th, 26th and 27th: Poland, Belgium and Brazil (combined responsible for 1.3% of Climate Debt and 2.4% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Poland, Belgium and Brazil (ranked 25th, 26th and 27th). By 2015, the shares of the three countries were similar. Since then, the Polish performance has declined, relatively.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 22nd, 23rd and 24th: Kazakhstan, Mexico and South Africa (combined responsible for 1.9% of Climate Debt and 3.0% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 22nd, 23rd and 24th: Kazakhstan, Mexico and South Africa (combined responsible for 1.9% of Climate Debt and 3.0% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Kazakhstan, Mexico and South Africa (ranked 22nd, 23rd and 24th). Kazakhstan’s share increased dramatically in a short period of time due to growing Fossil CO2 Emissions.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 19th, 20th and 21st: Oman, Netherlands and Turkey (combined responsible for 2.2% of Climate Debt and 1.7% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 19th, 20th and 21st: Oman, Netherlands and Turkey (combined responsible for 2.2% of Climate Debt and 1.7% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Oman, Netherlands and Turkey (ranked 19th, 20th and 21st). The share Netherlands is decreasing steadily, whereas Turkey’s is increasing.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 16th, 17th and 18th: The United Kingdom, Spain and Malaysia (combined responsible for 2.8% of Climate Debt and 2.5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 16th, 17th and 18th: The United Kingdom, Spain and Malaysia (combined responsible for 2.8% of Climate Debt and 2.5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of the United Kingdom, Spain and Malaysia (ranked 16th, 17th and 18th). The shares of the United Kingdom and Spain are decreasing, while the Malaysian share is increasing.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 13th, 14th and 15th: France, United Arab Emirates and Italy (combined responsible for 3.5% of Climate Debt and 2.5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 13th, 14th and 15th: France, United Arab Emirates and Italy (combined responsible for 3.5% of Climate Debt and 2.5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of France, United Arab Emirates and Italy (ranked 13th, 14th and 15th). The share of United Arab Emirates has increased along with an extreme population growth.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 7th, 8th and 9th: South Korea, Australia and Germany (combined responsible for 9% of Climate Debt and 5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 7th, 8th and 9th: South Korea, Australia and Germany (combined responsible for 9% of Climate Debt and 5% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of South Korea, Australia and Germany (ranked 7th, 8th and 9th). The South Korean share is stable over time, Australia’s is decreasing although at a slower rate lately, while Germany’s is increasing.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 4th, 5th and 6th: Canada, Russia and Saudi Arabia (combined responsible for 12% of Climate Debt and 8% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 4th, 5th and 6th: Canada, Russia and Saudi Arabia (combined responsible for 12% of Climate Debt and 8% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Canada, Russia and Saudi Arabia (ranked 4th, 5th and 6th). Canada’s share is decreasing, while Russia’s and Saudi Arabia’s are increasing. Global Climate Debt accumulated since 2000 is $7.2 Trillion.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 1st, 2nd and 3rd: The United States, China and Japan (combined responsible for 55% of Climate Debt and 47% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 1st, 2nd and 3rd: The United States, China and Japan (combined responsible for 55% of Climate Debt and 47% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of the United States, Japan and China (ranked 1st, 2nd and 3rd). The shares of the United States and Japan are decreasing at slower rates lately, whereas China’s is increasing fast. Global Climate Debt accumulated since 2000 is $7.2 Trillion.

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Indicator updates: GDP-ppp 2016 and Climate Change Financing (now only Multilateral Funds)

Indicator updates: GDP-ppp 2016 and Climate Change Financing (now only Multilateral Funds)

2016-updates of national per capita GDP(ppp-$) from ‘World Bank‘ is now available in ‘Calculation (Excel)‘. The world’s average per capita GDP(ppp-$) grew from $15,668 in 2015 to 16,136 in 2016 (3.0% growth). The diagram below shows the development in per capita GDP(ppp-$) 2000-2016 of the world’s five largest per capita emitters of CO2 from Fossil Fuel and cement: Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, Kuwait, Bahrain and Brunei; in comparison with the world average.

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Indicator update: Climate change financing as share of Climate Debt, by country (Climate Funds Update)

Indicator update: Climate change financing as share of Climate Debt, by country (Climate Funds Update)

Climate Funds Update‘ is providing information on finance for developing countries to address climate change. Around $26 billion has currently been funded (money deposited; data from October 2016), of which 96% is country-sourced. If all sources of income are included¹, then the funds amount to $30 billion, of which 81% is country-sourced. The country-sourced climate finance has increased by 25% since June 2016 (in eight months). The previous seven month the increase was 24%.

The table below shows: 1) the current Climate Debt per capita in ClimatePositions, 2) the per capita climate change financing (funding) to developing countries and 3) the climate financing as share of the Climate Debt. The table includes 35 countries with both climate change financing and Climate Debt in ClimatePositions. Note that only countries with full data in ClimatePositions are included.

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Climate change performance: India vs. Russia (CO2 Emissions from coal)

Climate change performance: India vs. Russia (CO2 Emissions from coal)

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, annually since 2000, of India and Russia. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt. The world’s 3rd and 4th largest CO2-emitters were responsible for 6.5% (India) and 4.9% (Russia) of global emissions in 2015. India’s per capita emissions were 1.7 tons in 2015 (preliminary), which was 4.0% above the 2014-level.

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Climate change performance: China vs. the United States (wealth inequality)

Climate change performance: China vs. the United States (wealth inequality)

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, annually since 2000, of China and the United States. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt. The world’s two largest CO2-emitters were responsible for 29% (China) and 15% of global emissions in 2015.

Apparently, China’s per capita emissions have peaked, while the moderate reduction-rate 2006-2012 of the United States, has flattened out.

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Predicted impact of climate change: $369 trillion by 2200 (study)

Predicted impact of climate change: $369 trillion by 2200 (study)

Nobody knows how high the costs of global warming will be in the future. However, ‘Studies’ predict a total of $369 trillion by 2200, assuming that humans will have stopped emitting greenhouse gases from burning Fossil Fuels around 2100 and atmospheric CO2 concentrations will have reached 700 ppm. The calculations include accelerating release of methane from melting permafrost (13% of the total costs).

ClimatePositions calculates the ‘Climate Debt’, accumulated since 2000, for 148 countries with full data. The global Climate Debt amounted to $0.8 trillion in 2005, $2.6 trillion in 2010 and around $6.0 trillion in 2015 (preliminary estimate). The diagram below illustrates the accumulated Climate Debts (red dots) “smooth climbing” towards the predicted costs of $369 trillion by 2200 (black dot) … all speculatively of course!

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Climate change performance of the United Kingdom in comparison with the European Union

Climate change performance of the United Kingdom in comparison with the European Union

Given that the United Kingdom (UK) has decided to leave the European Union (EU), the following examines the development of CO2 Emissions, Ecological Footprint, GDP(ppp-$) and Climate Debt of the UK in comparison with EU.

Between 1860 and 1890 the UK was the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitter and as late as 1966 the UK was still the 4th largest emitter. See this ‘Interactive timeline of the world’s top 20 emitters‘. When it comes to CO2 Emissions from fossil fuels (without bunker fuels) and cement production the UK was the world’s 15th largest emitter in 2014 (preliminary).

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Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines accuses Shell, BP, Chevron, BHP Billiton, Anglo American and 42 other carbon companies of breaching people’s fundamental rights to life, food, water, sanitation, adequate housing and self-determination

Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines accuses Shell, BP, Chevron, BHP Billiton, Anglo American and 42 other carbon companies of breaching people’s fundamental rights to life, food, water, sanitation, adequate housing and self-determination

According to ‘The Guardian’ the Filipino government body ‘Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines‘ have given the world’s largest oil, coal, cement and mining companies 45 days to respond to a ‘legal complaint (pdf, 65 p)‘ that their greenhouse gas emissions have violated the human rights of millions of people living in the Philippines.

The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights explicitly call on companies to respect human rights, and there are three scenarios in which a company can be hold responsible for adverse impacts on human rights, quote: “(1) it may cause impacts through its own activities; (2) it may contribute to impacts through its own activities, either directly or through some outside entity (government, business, or other); and (3) it may be involved in impacts caused by an entity that is directly linked to its business operations, products, or services.”

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Update 2016: Climate financing as share of Climate Debt, by country

Update 2016: Climate financing as share of Climate Debt, by country

[Modified version posted 17 June 2016] ‘Climate Funds Update’ is an independent website providing information on climate finance designed for developing countries to address climate change. The data is based on information received from 25 multilateral, bilateral, regional and national climate funds and the funding is largely up to date by the end of May 2016. A total of $21 billion has currently been funded (money deposited), of which around 95% is country-sourced. The global climate finance has increased by approximately 24% since October 2015 (in seven months). The table below shows the Climate Debt per capita in ClimatePositions, the per capita climate financing (funding) to developing countries and the climate financing as share of the Climate Debt.

The table includes 35 countries with both climate financing and Climate Debt in ClimatePositions (only countries with full data in ClimatePositions are included).

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Update: Climate funding as share of Climate Debt, by country

Update: Climate funding as share of Climate Debt, by country

Climate Funds Update’ is an independent website providing information on climate finance designed for developing countries to address climate change. The data is based on information received from 25 multilateral, bilateral, regional and national climate funds and the funding is largely up to date by the end of June 2015. A total of $17 billion has currently been funded (money deposited), of which 96% is country-sourced¹. The updated table below shows the level of national climate financing to developing countries, as percentage of the accumulated Climate Debt. The values are based on the latest available updates.

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New at COP21: The Vulnerable Twenty Group (V20)

New at COP21: The Vulnerable Twenty Group (V20)

Prior to COP21 in Paris in December twenty countries most at risk from the effects of global warming has formed ‘The Vulnerable Twenty Group (V20)’. Unified, the new group hopes for greater access to climate finance for adaptation and mitigation. The twenty countries representing almost one-tenth of the world’s population are: Bangladesh, Philippines, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Tanzania, Kenya, Afghanistan, Nepal, Ghana, Madagascar, Rwanda, Costa Rica, Bhutan, Timor-Leste, Maldives, Barbados, Vanuatu, Saint Lucia, Kiribati and Tuvalu. The first thirteen on the list have full data in ClimatePositions and they are all Contribution Free (no Climate Debt) among 147 countries (see the ‘ranking’). The last seven are examined below in terms of climate change performance.

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