Posts by tag: Thailand

Share of global Climate Debt rank 31st, 32nd and 33rd: Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (combined responsible for 1.0% of Climate Debt and 1.6% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 31st, 32nd and 33rd: Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (combined responsible for 1.0% of Climate Debt and 1.6% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Argentina, Thailand and Czech Republic (ranked 31st, 32nd and 33rd). The share of Argentina is increasing while the share of Thailand has flattened out.

/ Read More /
Share of global Climate Debt rank 28th, 29th and 30th: Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (combined responsible for 1.2% of Climate Debt and 2.2% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 28th, 29th and 30th: Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (combined responsible for 1.2% of Climate Debt and 2.2% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017, of Austria, Indonesia and Venezuela (ranked 28th, 29th and 30th). In 2015, the shares of each of the three countries were 0.40 or 0.41% of global Climate Debt.

/ Read More /
Climate change performance: Thailand vs. France

Climate change performance: Thailand vs. France

Thailand and France are the world’s 19th and 20th largest emitters of CO2 from Fossil Fuels and cement. Combined, the two countries were responsible for 1.8% of world CO2 Emissions in 2015. The following examines the ‘Indicators‘ of CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$), Ecological Footprint, Forest Cover and Nuclear Power.

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, since 2000. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt.

/ Read More /
Climate change performance: Brazil vs. Mexico

Climate change performance: Brazil vs. Mexico

Brazil and Mexico are the world’s 11th and 12th largest emitters of CO2 from Fossil Fuels and cement. Combined, the two countries were responsible for 2.8% of world CO2 Emissions in 2015. The following examines the ‘Indicators‘ of CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$), Forest Cover, Primary Forest and Ecological Footprint (without carbon footprint).

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, since 2000. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt.

/ Read More /
Climate change performance of Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines

Climate change performance of Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines

6.4% of the world population lives in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia or the Philippines – they emitted 3.2% of the global carbon dioxide from fossil fuels in 2012. The four diagrams below show the emissions per capita 2000-2013 (preliminary estimates of 2013) of the four populous countries of which only the Philippines is Contribution Free (no climate debt) in ClimatePositions. The green bars are the Contribution Free Level of CO2 Emissions calculated from emissions in 1990s and a number of continuously updated ‘indicators’.

/ Read More /
China’s growing climate debt and carbon dioxide emissions is catastrophic

China’s growing climate debt and carbon dioxide emissions is catastrophic

Today, China ‘agreed‘ with the United States (without the Republicans!?) that the Chinese CO2 Emissions can increase by 2030, after which emissions shall decrease. The agreement is legally non-binding and can almost be seen as a confirmation of the ‘worst case climate scenario. The first diagram shows the CO2 Emissions of China (the black bars) in decades in comparison with the world average (the grey bars). The green bars show the Chinese Contribution Free Levels in ClimatePositions. Today the Climate Contribution (climate debt) is $402 per capita and the ranking is 52nd out of 147 countries (see the ‘ranking’). The updated Chinese Climate Contribution is 10.3% of the global contribution, second only to the United States (see the ‘ranking’).

/ Read More /
Indonesia fails on deforestation and CO2 Emissions

Indonesia fails on deforestation and CO2 Emissions

Indonesia was the 73rd worst performing country out of 145 in ClimatePositions 2010 with a total Climate Contribution (climate debt) of 5.6 billion US$. As shown in the front diagram Indonesia cut down the total forest cover (mainly rainforest) from 65.4% in 1990 to 52.1% in 2010. Had Indonesia maintained the forest cover since 1990, then the saving in Contribution would have been 4.6 billion US$. In the updated calculation the Contribution (debt) has increased to 6.5 billion US$.

/ Read More /