Posts by tag: China

Uzbekistan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Uzbekistan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Uzbekistan’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $1.20 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $43 per capita in 2015 to $93 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Environmental Performance.

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Pakistan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions (zero Climate Debt)

Pakistan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions (zero Climate Debt)

Although Pakistan’s accumulated Climate Debt is zero, the populous country is the world’s 32nd largest emitter of Fossil CO2.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$), Environmental Performance and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Malaysia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Malaysia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Malaysia’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $20.82 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $1,454 per capita in 2015 to $2,902 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Vietnam – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Vietnam – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Vietnam’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $0.88 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $6 per capita in 2015 to $26 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$), Forest Cover, Primary Forest and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Thailand – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Thailand – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Thailand’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $7.92 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $265 per capita in 2015 to $535 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Taiwan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt (estimated)

Taiwan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt (estimated)

Due to lack of some indicator data from the ‘sources‘ Taiwan is not ranked in ClimatePositions. However, by estimating the indicator values of GDP(ppp-$)¹, Forest Cover² and Ecological Footprint³, then the calculation of Taiwan’s Climate Debt can still be made with some accuracy.

With the noted indicator assumptions, then the Taiwanese current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $40 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000, and the per capita Climate Debt amounts to $8,800 in 2020. For comparison, updated Rankings of 165 countries with full data are available in the menu “Climate Debt” (Taiwan ranks 13th).

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions,  Nuclear Power and Environmental Performance.

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Kazakhstan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Kazakhstan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Kazakhstan’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $16.18 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $2,041 per capita in 2015 to $4,025 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Indonesia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Indonesia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Indonesia’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $4.50 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $82 per capita in 2015 to $147 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$), Ecological Footprint without carbon, Forest Cover and Primary Forest.

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Saudi Arabia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Saudi Arabia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Saudi Arabia’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $45.11 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $5,683 per capita in 2015 to $13,955 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Iran – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Iran – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Iran’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $15.69 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $1,095 per capita in 2015 to $2,153 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$), Ecological Footprint (without carbon) and Nuclear Power.

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Japan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Japan – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Japan’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $20.35 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $1,952 per capita in 2015 to $3,734 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$), Nuclear Power and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Russia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Russia – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

Russia’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $12.16 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $1,346 per capita in 2015 to $2,676 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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China – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

China – per capita Fossil CO2 Emissions and Climate Debt

China’s current Climate Breakdown Pricing amounts to $12.33 per tons Fossil CO2 emitted since 2000. The Climate Debt grew from $593 per capita in 2015 to $1,395 in 2020. Updated Rankings of 165 countries are available in the menu “Climate Debt”.

The following diagrams expose the trends of Fossil CO2 Emissions, Climate Debt, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint without carbon.

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Share of global Climate Debt rank 1st, 2nd and 3rd: The United States, China and Japan (combined responsible for 55% of Climate Debt and 47% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

Share of global Climate Debt rank 1st, 2nd and 3rd: The United States, China and Japan (combined responsible for 55% of Climate Debt and 47% of Fossil CO2 Emissions 2016)

The diagram below shows ‘Share of global Climate Debt‘ in 2010, 2015 and 2017 of the United States, Japan and China (ranked 1st, 2nd and 3rd). The shares of the United States and Japan are decreasing at slower rates lately, whereas China’s is increasing fast. Global Climate Debt accumulated since 2000 is $7.2 Trillion.

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Global Carbon Project (CDIAC), located in the United States, stops publishing carbon emissions data by country – will be replaced by EDGAR in ClimatePositions

Global Carbon Project (CDIAC), located in the United States, stops publishing carbon emissions data by country – will be replaced by EDGAR in ClimatePositions

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has published annual Carbon Emissions from Fossil Fuels and cement production by country since 1959 (‘Global Carbon Project‘), but now this continuous time series has come to an end and 2015 will be the last data-year (as it seems).

Since carbon emissions data from CDIAC (Global Carbon Project) is the core ‘Indicator‘ in ClimatePositions’ calculation of Climate Debt, carbon emissions data will be replaced with nearly similar data from ‘EDGAR‘ (‘European Commission‘ / ‘Climate Action‘), retroactively since 1990, in connection with the coming updates [done 16-08-2017].

The following describes the differences between CO2 Emissions data from Global Carbon Project (CDIAC) and EDGAR (sourced: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC)/Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL). Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR)), and the consequences in terms of Climate Debt in ClimatePositions – illustrated with a range of country examples. Note that other sources, such as ‘IEA‘, ‘EIA‘ and ‘BP‘, provides CO2 Emissions data-sets different from the ones of CDIAC and EDGAR.

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World CO2 Emissions 2000-2059: with 50% risk of 2C global warming (two per capita emission-scenarios for the United States, Denmark, Spain, China, India and Nigeria)

World CO2 Emissions 2000-2059: with 50% risk of 2C global warming (two per capita emission-scenarios for the United States, Denmark, Spain, China, India and Nigeria)

In continuation of the previous article ‘Carbon Brief: Global Carbon Budget and CO2 Emission scenarios (50% risk of 1.5°C, 2.0°C and 3.0°C warming)‘, the following examines the per capita CO2 Emission budget 2000-2059, with a 50% risk of 2°C global warming (which of course is unacceptable). The outcome is then compared with Climate Debt Free CO2 Emission levels (in ClimatePositions) of the United States, Denmark, Spain, China, India and Nigeria, during the same 60-year period. Also, the Paris Agreements reduction commitment of the United States is put into perspective.

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Climate change performance: Malaysia vs. Spain

Climate change performance: Malaysia vs. Spain

Malaysia and Spain are the world’s 23rd and 24th largest emitters of CO2 from Fossil Fuels and cement. Combined, the two countries were responsible for 1.4% of world CO2 Emissions in 2015. The following examines the ‘Indicators‘ of CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$), Forest Cover (and Primary Forest) and Environmental Performance.

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, since 2000. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt. The Spanish reductions are pretty much balanced by the Malaysian increases … which is world symptomatic.

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Climate change performance: The United Kingdom vs. Australia

Climate change performance: The United Kingdom vs. Australia

The United Kingdom and Australia and are the world’s 15th and 16th largest emitters of CO2 from Fossil Fuels and cement. Combined, the two countries were responsible for 2.2% of world CO2 Emissions in 2015. The following examines the ‘Indicators’ of CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$) and Ecological Footprint (without carbon footprint).

The diagrams below show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, since 2000. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt.

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Climate change performance: South Korea vs. Indonesia (peatlands in Southeast Asia)

Climate change performance: South Korea vs. Indonesia (peatlands in Southeast Asia)

In 2015 South Korea and Indonesia accounted for 3.60% and 0.51% of the global Climate Debt, respectively (see the ‘Ranking‘). The following examines the ‘Indicators‘ of CO2 Emissions, GDP(ppp-$), Forest Cover (and peatlands) and Primary Forest.

The first two diagrams show the per capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel (without bunkers) and cement, annually since 2000, of South Korea and Indonesia. The green bars show the Free Emission Level¹ – the exceedance is the basis for calculating the national Climate Debt. The world’s 9th and 10th largest CO2-emitters were responsible for 1.7% (South Korea) and 1.5% (Indonesia) of global emissions in 2015, respectively. South Korea’s per capita emissions were 11.7 tons in 2015 (preliminary), while Indonesia’s were 2.1 tons (preliminary), which was 2.2% above the 2014-level.

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Global Indicator Update: Land Temperature 2016 (warmest year on record)

Global Indicator Update: Land Temperature 2016 (warmest year on record)

The year 2016 was by far the hottest on planet Earth since measurements began in 1880. Both global Land (air) Temperature and Ocean (air) Temperature were the hottest on record. See the development in Land Temperature between 1960 and 2016 in the diagram below. The average temperature rise 1880-1937 is set at 0°C (baseline 1880-1937) and 2016 was 1.73°C warmer. The development since 1880 in Land Temperature and Ocean Temperature (and the two combined) are available at ‘ncdc.noaa.gov‘.

Added 22-01-17: The Ocean Temperature 2016 was 0.94°C warmer compared to baseline 1880-1937, and Land and Ocean Temperature combined was 1.15°C warmer. Note that other sources may refer to baseline 1881-1910 or even 1951-1980.

Added 07-02-2017: Soon, the global temperature ‘Indicator’ in ClimatePosition will be changed from Land (air) Temperature (10-years average) to Land/Ocean (air) Temperature (10-years average). The change will not affect the current accumulated Climate Debt of any country, only the future calculation.

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